Miller’s Monday Morning Message

Andrew MillerMiller’s Monday Morning Message
presented by ACM Consulting Inc.

Andrew Miller on operational excellence, strategy, life balance and everything in between

Toronto – February 24, 2014
Now that the Olympics are over and we have had two weeks of national pride, it’s a good time to reflect. During the gold medal hockey game yesterday morning, I’m sure almost every Canadian family was watching from wherever they were. Why is hockey so important to us? Because we are good at it, we are passionate about it, and we are proud of our abilities in it.
 
How can you ensure that your employees have that same level of pride and passion for your organization? There are three key components:
  • Strengths – Employees want to be a part of a successful organization, so focus on your strengths and leverage them to improve.
  • Passion – People throughout the organization need to be passionate about what the organization is trying to accomplish.
  • Pride – Employees need to have something to be proud of. Do you give them proud moments they can tell friends and family about?
It seems easy to have national pride, but it’s important to recognize why we have that national pride and apply it to your organization to foster a similar feeling amongst your employees.

To request an interview or more information, please contact:
 
Andrew Miller
416-480-1336
 
Follow me on Twitter @AndrewMillerACM
© Andrew Miller. All rights reserved. 2014.

Miller’s Monday Morning Message

Andrew MillerMiller’s Monday Morning Message
presented by ACM Consulting Inc.

Andrew Miller on operational excellence, strategy, life balance and everything in between

Toronto – February 17, 2014
Every two years in the weeks before the Olympic games begin, we focus on all of the problems that will arise. For the Sochi games we worried about hotel rooms not being finished, security at the games, water that wasn’t drinkable, professional athletes having to share college dorm-style rooms, Canadian hockey goalies, and many other petty things. One week into the games, none of these concerns are relevant anymore. We even joke about them. That’s because they really weren’t issues to begin with. They were items that distracted us from the real story of the Olympics, which is the athletes, the competitions, and the camaraderie. As soon as the games began, all of this talk went away because we focused on what the Olympics is truly all about.
 
What distractions are taking away your ability to focus on the real issues and opportunities in your organization?

To request an interview or more information, please contact:
 
Andrew Miller
416-480-1336
 
Follow me on Twitter @AndrewMillerACM
© Andrew Miller. All rights reserved. 2014.

The Olympics

I have been watching the Olympics as much as I can and I’ve realized that it doesn’t even really matter what sport I watch anymore. I am excited about the competitive nature of the games and the great stories about the athletes.

As was expected, as soon as the games started, all of the talk about small beds, unfinished hotel rooms, security, and yellow water has gone away.

A reporter asked Mike Babcock, coach of Team Canada’s hockey team, about how strange it was that his three goalies had to share a room. His response, “Why is that an issue? Have three goalies never shared a room before? You guys are making something out of nothing.”

The bottom line is that most athletes are so happy to compete for their country and are so honoured to be at the Olympics, that sleeping conditions are not even as issue.

It seems that the quality of reporting in many cases has been reduced. Maybe reporters are becoming obsolete. Maybe there are so many media people that there are bound to be bad ones. Certainly the ones who make something out of nothing would fall into that category.

In a world of social media and instant information, there is less importance on the media insiders to tell us the story. I would rather hear it directly from the source.

Those media people who will survive will be the ones who can cut through all of the useless information and give us a unique perspective. All others will never be heard from again.

Miller’s Monday Morning Message

Andrew MillerMiller’s Monday Morning Message
presented by ACM Consulting Inc.

Andrew Miller on operational excellence, strategy, life balance and everything in between

Toronto – February 10, 2014
Many organizations struggle with balancing the acquisition of new customers and the retention of existing customers. Even though these two are linked, the strategies are often different. When an organization wants to grow, it’s very easy to look for growth with new customers. We get motivated by bringing in new customers and closing the deal. But we need to remember two things: growth can also come from existing customers, and growth from new customers should not come at the expense of your existing customers.

Here are some things to think about:
  • Growth can come from both acquiring new customers as well as from offering more to existing customers.
  • If you focus too much on just bringing in new customers, you will erode your existing customer base.
  • Once you bring on a new customer, ensure they now become part of your retention strategy.
  • You can leverage relationships with existing customers to gain introductions to new prospective customers.
Your customer acquisition, on-boarding and retention strategies can be different but need to be strongly linked together. Don’t focus on one at the expense of the other. The most successful organizations are able to bring on new customers quickly and easily while holding onto the customers they already have.

To request an interview or more information, please contact:
 
Andrew Miller
416-480-1336
 
Follow me on Twitter @AndrewMillerACM
© Andrew Miller. All rights reserved. 2014.

Miller’s Monday Morning Message

Andrew MillerMiller’s Monday Morning Message
presented by ACM Consulting Inc.

Andrew Miller on operational excellence, strategy, life balance and everything in between

Toronto – February 3, 2014
Last week I held a workshop on Operational Excellence at the Hilton DoubleTree Hotel in downtown Toronto with more than 20 managers and executives from different industries and different organizations. The day was filled with great discussions about the components of operational excellence, the key elements for implementing successful change, and how to engage employees to help organizations improve performance and maximize profitability. In between all of these great discussions, we found time for some good networking and interacting.
 
Here are some of the key insights from the workshop:
  • Operational excellence is a mind-set, not a tool or a methodology. It must be present in every action and decision organizations (and individuals) make.
  • Organizations need to pursue excellence, not perfection. Perfection leads to disappointment, excellence leads to improved results.
  • Operational excellence happens on the front lines of an organization, so empowerment of employees and productive failure must be prevalent in the culture.
  • Organizations need to focus on outcomes and results to ensure the tactics they perform will add value. Too often we focus on the completion of activities without knowing what we are trying to achieve.
  • Effective execution of a strategy is what differentiates great organizations from everyone else.
  • An effective way of increasing employee retention is to solicit ideas for improvement and act on them.

If you would like more information about the workshop or its content, don’t hesitate to contact me. 

To request an interview or more information, please contact:
 
Andrew Miller
416-480-1336
 
Follow me on Twitter @AndrewMillerACM
© Andrew Miller. All rights reserved. 2014.