Miller’s Monday Morning Message

Andrew MillerMiller’s Monday Morning Message
presented by ACM Consulting Inc.

Andrew Miller on operational excellence, strategy, life balance and everything in between

Toronto – March 31, 2014
The new baseball season begins today so it feels like spring is here. For most sports teams, once their season ends, they assess the season as a whole and identify what worked and what didn’t. They assess their personnel, their culture, their strategies, their management, their key people, their roles and responsibilities, their accomplishments, their successes, and their failures. They then try to make changes to improve results.
 
Organizations are no different, although you don’t have the luxury of an off-season to take a step back and really assess what needs to be done. But the best organizations make sure they take time to reassess strategies, talent, performance, and opportunities for improvement. When does your “season” end? How often do you step back and assess your organization to find ways to improve performance?
 
The more often you can do this, the more able you will be to take advantages of opportunities when they present themselves.
To request an interview or more information, please contact:
 
Andrew Miller
416-480-1336
 
Follow me on Twitter @AndrewMillerACM
© Andrew Miller. All rights reserved. 2014.

Tips on How and Why to Share Successes

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Andrew explains the positive effects of co-workers sharing internal successes and highlights some examples of how to do this effectively.

How to Harness Innovative Thoughts and Make Them Reality

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Andrew discusses his cycle of innovation and walks the listener through the process so they can set the wheels in motion and make their own innovative thoughts become reality.

The Cycle of Innovation

Miller’s Monday Morning Message

Andrew MillerMiller’s Monday Morning Message
presented by ACM Consulting Inc.

Andrew Miller on operational excellence, strategy, life balance and everything in between

Toronto – March 24, 2014
When we consider companies that were having tremendous success and then failed, like Nortel, Enron, Blackberry, and Blockbuster, there are only a few reasons for their sudden fall from grace:

  • Arrogance and/or stubbornness – The organization and its leaders believed that continuing to operate in the same way would lead to continued success. They refused to change the way they operated even though the market required them to do so.
  • Inability to take advantage of new opportunities – The organization was either unable to see new opportunities or not flexible enough to take advantage of them.
  • Increased distance from customers – The organization created too wide a gap between itself and its customers and wasn’t able to anticipate what customers wanted or needed.
  • Misalignment of strategy and tactics – The tactics being performed on the front lines of the organization did not align with the strategy being developed in the executive boardroom.
  • Greed – The organization’s leaders focused too much on creating money and power for themselves and not enough on creating value for customers.

Just avoid these five things and you will see continued success in your organization and operational excellence will come naturally.

To request an interview or more information, please contact:
 
Andrew Miller
416-480-1336
 
Follow me on Twitter @AndrewMillerACM
© Andrew Miller. All rights reserved. 2014.

Why Successful Companies Fail

When you think of companies like Nortel, Enron, Blackberry, and Blockbuster, companies that were having tremendous success and then failed, there are only a few reasons why the sudden decline.

  • Arrogance and/or stubbornness – The organization and its leaders believed that continuing to operate the same way would lead to continued success. They refused to change the way they operated.
  • Inability to take advantage of new opportunities – The organization was either unable to see new opportunities or not flexible enough to take advantage of them.
  • Increased distance from customers – The organization created too wide a gap between itself and its customers and wasn’t able to anticipate what customers wanted or needed.
  • Misalignment of strategy and tactics – The tactics being performed on the front lines of the organization did not align with the strategy being developed in the executive boardroom.
  • Greed – The organization’s leaders focused too much on creating money and power for themselves and not enough on creating value for customers.

Just avoid these five things and you will see continued success in your organization and operational excellence will come naturally.

Miller’s Monday Morning Message

Andrew MillerMiller’s Monday Morning Message
presented by ACM Consulting Inc.

Andrew Miller on operational excellence, strategy, life balance and everything in between

Toronto – March 17, 2014
March Madness, the annual college basketball tournament in the United States, begins this week. For the next three weeks, the best college basketball teams will play for the national championship. What is equally exciting is watching the fans from the different colleges cheer on their teams. These fans are proud and passionate about the colleges they attend and are not afraid to show it.
 
Are you creating fans for your organization?
 
Your employees should be just as proud and passionate about your organization as they are for their alma mater. There are a few things you can do to ensure you are creating an organization full of fans, and here are three of them:
  • Hire people who are passionate about your organization and what you offer. I have developed the ACM model which are principles to be used when hiring.
  • Perform random acts of recognition. Make sure your employees know that they are respected and appreciated.
  • Offer them new and challenging work. There are always big upsets in March Madness when a team has a huge challenge to beat a better team and they take advantage of that opportunity. You’ll never know how good employees can be unless they are given the opportunity to do great things.
So while you are sitting back and enjoying March Madness over the next three weeks, think about how you can help your employees become fanatics for your organization.

To request an interview or more information, please contact:
 
Andrew Miller
416-480-1336
 
Follow me on Twitter @AndrewMillerACM
© Andrew Miller. All rights reserved. 2014.

Miller’s Monday Morning Message

Andrew MillerMiller’s Monday Morning Message
presented by ACM Consulting Inc.

Andrew Miller on operational excellence, strategy, life balance and everything in between

Toronto – March 10, 2014
I recently rented a car from Hertz while on vacation with my family. We reserved a mini-van, but when we arrived to pick up our car, they were out of mini-vans. After doing my best version of Seinfeld’s “Why take a reservation if you can’t keep a reservation?” shtick, the employee offered me a free upgrade. I explained to him that the free upgrade was of no value to me, that I needed the cargo room and space of a mini-van and could he please check another company to see if they had one for me.
 
He became frustrated and even a little belligerent, telling me that this is how the rental car industry works. If a car is not available, then customers are offered a free upgrade. He kept insisting how great this was for me, the customer. I asked, “What if the upgrade is of no value to me?” His response, “Well, that’s the way things are done and I’ve offered you a better car for the same price.” When I asked if he could look into other companies for me to find a mini-van, he told me to feel free to do  the research myself but he “doesn’t do that sort of thing.” I begrudgingly took the upgraded car and of course our luggage barely fit and it is not an ideal layout for my family, but hey, it’s a free upgrade so that must be valuable. Do you still need convincing that customer retention happens on the front lines?
 
I’m still blown away by how poorly some rental car companies operate and I’m not sure I’ll be using Hertz again. They have given me no reason to come back.
 
Are you offering something that your customers value, or merely something you think they value? There’s a big difference.
 
For more information on customer retention on the front lines, download my new audio book. To request an interview or more information, please contact:
 
Andrew Miller
416-480-1336
 
Follow me on Twitter @AndrewMillerACM
© Andrew Miller. All rights reserved. 2014.