Teleconference – Redefining Operational Excellence

In this teleconference, Andrew talks about why operational excellence needs to be redefined, the five components of operational excellence, and many other practical concepts from his new book, Redefining Operational Excellence: New Strategies for Maximizing Performance and Profits Across the Organization.

Miller’s Monday Morning Message

Andrew MillerMiller’s Monday Morning Message
presented by ACM Consulting Inc.

Andrew Miller on operational excellence, strategy, life balance and everything in between

Toronto – May 26, 2014
All organizations are trying to figure out how to increase profit margins. Increasing revenues, lowering costs, retaining customers, and managing pricing better are all ways this can happen. But what’s most important in improving profit margins is tapping into the emotions of the customer. That’s where E = mc2  comes in.
 
E = Emotion
m = Margin
c2 = Customer Continuance
 
In this context, E = mc2 means that emotional appeal with customers improves your margins. Stated another way, if you can create an emotional connection with your customers, margins will go up. It’s that simple. Creating that emotional connection makes customer retention easier. It creates loyal ambassadors for your brand. It even makes acquiring new customers easier. It makes growth easier.
 
Einstein used this equation to describe the theory of relativity, I’m using it to describe the practice of profitability. This is not a theory. Make an emotional connection with your customers and they will continue to buy from you, and your margins will increase.
 
What can you do to ensure that E = mc2 in your organization?
 
To request an interview or more information, please contact:
 
Andrew Miller
416-480-1336

My new book, Redefining Operational Excellence, is now available. Click here to order your copy.

Follow me on Twitter @AndrewMillerACM
© Andrew Miller. All rights reserved. 2014.

Miller’s Monday Morning Message

Andrew MillerMiller’s Monday Morning Message
presented by ACM Consulting Inc.

Andrew Miller on operational excellence, strategy, life balance and everything in between

Toronto – May 19, 2014
In a recent survey the insurance company Travelers asked more than 1,100 business owners and executives what they worry about most. The two most popular answers were increasing medical costs (67%) and increasing employee benefit costs (62%). Of course, these two responses are very much related. Surprisingly, attracting and retaining top people was seventh on the list.
 
Of course we can look at the way the question was phrased, “How much do you worry about this threatening your business?” But what’s more important is that this should be a wake-up call (as if we needed one) that the current healthcare system is not sustainable.
 
Whether you are in Canada or in the US, the current models will not provide us with the proper care moving forward. Funding changes in Canada, the Affordable Care Act in the US, increasing need for personalized medicine. Name the reason, but it all comes back to the fact that we need to change how we operate. So how do we do that?
 
We make it easier for healthcare providers to adopt new innovative procedures and technology, and for companies to show how their new products and services can impact the overall cost to the system. We make more funding accessible where providers and industry can partner to find better solutions. We give healthcare providers the tools to apply new ideas more quickly and effectively. We take a more holistic view of a patient to ensure the right care, in the right place, at the right time.
 
We know what to do, we just need to do it. Have you done all you can do to make the healthcare system more sustainable?
 
To request an interview or more information, please contact:
 
Andrew Miller
416-480-1336
 
Follow me on Twitter @AndrewMillerACM
© Andrew Miller. All rights reserved. 2014.

Miller’s Monday Morning Message

Andrew MillerMiller’s Monday Morning Message
presented by ACM Consulting Inc.

Andrew Miller on operational excellence, strategy, life balance and everything in between

Toronto – May 12, 2014
Innovation is the new buzz word. But if we assume innovation means improving performance and not just restoring past performance, we can all agree that organizations need to innovate in order to be successful. In my experience working with organizations of all kinds, the most innovative companies (and therefore the most successful ones) share certain characteristics:

  • They know what innovation means to them, why innovation is important, and are able to communicate that effectively
  • Their employees have the freedom to fail productively
  • They focus on improving performance, not just fixing things through problem-solving
  • They reward behaviour, not just victories (acknowledgement)
  • They encourage internal and external collaboration
  • They always look for ways to get the same or better results, only faster and cheaper
  • They include the identification of innovative practices in individual performance evaluations
  • They formally manage the process of innovation
How many of these characteristics can you comfortably say your organization has?
 

To request an interview or more information, please contact:
 
Andrew Miller
416-480-1336
 
Follow me on Twitter @AndrewMillerACM
© Andrew Miller. All rights reserved. 2014.

Miller’s Monday Morning Message

Andrew MillerMiller’s Monday Morning Message
presented by ACM Consulting Inc.

Andrew Miller on operational excellence, strategy, life balance and everything in between

Toronto – May 5, 2014
We talk so often about the importance of experience and we feel that the longer we have been doing something, the better we are at it. But that’s not necessarily true. Just because someone has been in the same job for 25 years doesn’t mean they can do it better than someone who has never done it before. The fact that a person has 30 years experience in the same industry doesn’t make them an expert in the industry, it just means they have been there a long time.
 
We often overrate experience because it gives us comfort to hire someone with experience. You can’t go wrong hiring someone who has 25 years experience in the same industry, can you? Of course you can.
 
The Toronto Raptors lost to the Brooklyn Nets yesterday in Game 7 of their playoff series. Through the previous 10 games, the teams were very evenly matched even though Brooklyn’s players have a great deal more experience than the Raptors. But they only won by one point. If the Raptors, the more inexperienced team, had won, would anyone talk about the importance of Brooklyn’s experience?
 
Experience may be a factor in the results a person can achieve, but we shouldn’t be hiring or making decisions purely based on someone’s experience. We should be hiring someone based on their ability to achieve the results we expect. Experience is only one factor that may contribute to their ability to get those results.
 
Before looking at experience, organizations that are hiring should be looking at a candidate’s attitude, competency, and mindset. This is my ACM model. Experience only matters if it will help achieve better results. Don’t hire purely based on experience, but based on whether you think the candidate can meet or exceed what is expected of them.
 
To request an interview or more information, please contact:
 
Andrew Miller
416-480-1336
 
Follow me on Twitter @AndrewMillerACM
© Andrew Miller. All rights reserved. 2014.