Podcast: The Future of Operational Excellence in Healthcare

In my latest podcast, The Future of Operational Excellence in Healthcare, I talk about three themes that organizations need to master in order to be successful in the healthcare industry and I provide you with some practical strategies you can employ.

The three key themes are:

  1. Innovation – It’s not just about coming up with new ideas, the future of excellence is in the ability to apply and adopt new ideas to maximize results by managing the innovative process.
  2. Collaboration – Collaboration is a means to an end and organizations need to focus on the outcomes they want to achieve and then effectively collaborate to help achieve them.
  3. Performance – The most successful organizations are able to identify money and performance boosts in areas that others don’t normally look.

I invite you take a listen and comment here on your thoughts on the future of operational excellence in healthcare.

 

 

Miller’s Monday Morning Message

Andrew MillerMiller’s Monday Morning Message
presented by ACM Consulting Inc.

Andrew Miller on operational excellence, strategy, life balance and everything in between

Toronto – November 24, 2014
For those of you who have never used Uber, I feel bad for you. Uber has revolutionized the way we get around a city in a safe, convenient, and clean way. It has completely disrupted the taxi industry.
 
What did Uber do that is making it so successful? It eliminated everything that people hated about taking a taxi:
  • Not sure who your driver will be? Uber lets you see driver ratings from past customers.
  • Don’t want to stand in the middle of the road trying to hail a cab in the rain? Uber knows your location and picks you up there.
  • Not sure how much a trip will cost? Uber provides you the ability to get a quote based on your destination.
  • Don’t want to ride in a dirty cab? Uber cars are cleaner and nicer than the average taxi cab.
  • Need a cab that takes credit card or don’t want to fumble around for cash? Uber has your account information so you are automatically billed when you arrive at your destination.
  • Tired of waiting for a cab that may never come? Uber lets you track where you car is and how long until it arrives. 
What do customers hate about your industry and how can you eliminate it?
To request an interview or more information, please contact:
 
Andrew Miller
416-480-1336

Follow me on Twitter @AndrewMillerACM
© Andrew Miller. All rights reserved. 2014.

Three Kinds of Companies

There are only three kinds of companies:

  1. Those that are growing at the right pace.
  2. Those that are growing too fast.
  3. Those that are growing too slowly (or not at all).

Any other kind of company will fail. If you are not growing, you are declining. There is no such thing as the status quo because even if your organization is not changing, everything else around you is. Your competitors are changing. Your customers are changing. Your people are changing. Your industry is changing. Your government is changing.

So you need to become a company that grows at the right pace. How do you know you are growing at the right pace? You don’t make stupid mistakes. The quality of your product isn’t declining. You are able to take advantage of opportunities as they arise. You don’t feel like you are always playing catch-up.

Toyota grew too fast and it led to millions of cars being recalled because quality was sacrificed. Blockbuster grew too slowly and it became obsolete because it ignored the messages that customers were trying to deliver. Procter & Gamble continues to grow at the right speed, which is why it has had such tremendous success for such a long time.

There are four stages of growth. Once you commit to growing at the right pace you will find yourself at one of these four stages.

Four Types of Growth

Which stage are you at and what can you do to rapidly climb the stairs?

Miller’s Monday Morning Message

Miller’s Monday Morning Message
presented by ACM Consulting Inc.

Andrew Miller on operational excellence, strategy, life balance and everything in between

Toronto – November 17, 2014
Every morning when I read the business section, it is filled with articles about resources. I get it. We have a resource economy here in Canada. But why does it have to be that way? We used to have a thriving manufacturing industry. Now all we are trying to do is save what we have. We are in full survival mode when it comes to manufacturing jobs, with the focus being on the auto sector.
 
No wonder Canada falls so low on the productivity rankings. We seem to be innovative when it comes to technology (see the Kitchener-Waterloo corridor). We have some of the top business schools in North America, if not the world. We have access to most major markets through air, land, and sea. We have a diverse population with ties to all of the fastest-growing economies in the world. Yet we score poorly on innovation and productivity.
 
I believe that is BECAUSE we are so reliant on resources. Resources are always at the centre of any economic discussion. Why can’t we become the experts at some type of specialized manufacturing? What about assembling parts that were manufactured elsewhere? Why not focus on developing new ways to manufacture certain products faster and better? Or create a new supply chain that reduces touch points and risk?
 
Many smaller and mid-sized manufacturers have figured it out. They use recyclable materials, a “made in Canada” label, outsource where required, and an effective delivery model created to minimize risk. And they are very successful, not just in Canada. Check out Cate & Levi or Canada Goose or Korhani to see what I mean.
 
It’s time to redefine manufacturing in Canada. We need to stop focusing on productivity numbers and start looking at growth and profitability. That will move us from trying to save the industry, to having it thrive once again.
To request an interview or more information, please contact:
 
Andrew Miller
416-480-1336

www.acmconsulting.ca

Miller’s Monday Morning Message

Andrew MillerMiller’s Monday Morning Message
presented by ACM Consulting Inc.

Andrew Miller on operational excellence, strategy, life balance and everything in between

Toronto – November 10, 2014
We use the word “culture” to describe how an organization as a whole behaves. Entrepreneurial culture. Collaborative culture. Customer-focused culture. This doesn’t make much sense because we can’t change a culture. Culture is something that happens as a result of certain behaviours. When organizations say that they want to change their “culture,” what they really mean is that they want to change the behaviours in their organization.
 
Changing the behaviours of the employees in an organization is not that difficult in theory. Here’s a short how-to checklist:

  1. Determine the behaviour you want employees to exhibit.
  2. Tell employees the behaviour you expect them to exhibit.
  3. Ensure managers and leaders exhibit that behaviour.
  4. Evaluate and measure people based on whether or not they exhibit that behaviour.
Too many organizations don’t even make it past the first step because they really aren’t sure what kind of environment they want to have. They don’t know how they want their people to behave, or more likely, are unwilling to behave that way themselves.
 
When you try to change behaviours within your organization, what poses the biggest barrier to making those changes?
To request an interview or more information, please contact:
 
Andrew Miller
416-480-1336

Follow me on Twitter @AndrewMillerACM
© Andrew Miller. All rights reserved. 2014.

Miller’s Monday Morning Message

Andrew MillerMiller’s Monday Morning Message
presented by ACM Consulting Inc.

Andrew Miller on operational excellence, strategy, life balance and everything in between

Toronto – November 3, 2014
I recently finished Chris Hadfield’s, An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth. Aside from being a very entertaining book, one of the key messages for me was that sometimes we need to be away from something in order to appreciate it.
 
It made me think about all of the executives who don’t get a chance to be “away” from their organizations in order to identify where the opportunities lie. They aren’t able to remove themselves from the day to day operations of the business in order to take a broader view. 
 
It’s necessary to question why things are done a certain way, how a certain technology is used, or why a specific policy exists. But it’s difficult to ask those questions without the proper perspective. One that allows for a total view of the organization and where the executive wants to take it.
 
Since we don’t all have the luxury of traveling into space to gain that proper perspective, where do you go to take a bird’s eye view of your organization?
To request an interview or more information, please contact:
 
Andrew Miller
416-480-1336

Follow me on Twitter @AndrewMillerACM
© Andrew Miller. All rights reserved. 2014.