Does Your Office Space Align with Your Company’s Culture?

I was sitting down with a friend of mine, Joseph Wise, and we were talking about the challenges businesses have today around growth. Not just revenue growth, but also the number of employees. He asked me this question about my clients, “Does their office space align with their culture?” I told him that I had to think more about that, but that probably many of them didn’t think of office space in that context. It was an interesting perspective and I asked Joseph to provide me something that I could share with my clients and colleagues to help them think about office space differently.

In the attached document, Joseph provides some key questions to think about when considering new office space.

Joe Wise Corporate Culture Piece March 2016 Grey

Miller’s Monday Morning Message

Andrew MillerMiller’s Monday Morning Message
presented by ACM Consulting Inc.

Andrew Miller on operational excellence, strategy, life balance and everything in between

Toronto – August 10, 2015

There is a fine line between speed and structure for an organization. The problem is that most organizations have trouble finding that balance, especially ones that are growing very quickly. When should we race ahead and when do we need to have some discipline in our decision-making? People often this this is the classic dilemma between having an entrepreneurial culture versus a bureaucratic one. But this is a spectrum, and like any spectrum, you can strike a balance.

Here are some questions to consider to help you strike that balance:

  • What would be the impact, positive or negative, of making a quick decision?
  • Who is going to be most impacted by this decision and do they need to be involved in the making of the decision?
  • Is there any additional value in getting others involved?
  • When we give our employees the freedom to make decisions on their own, how do we react when they make the wrong decisions?
  • What internal barriers have we created that slows down decision-making and our ability to be flexible, but doesn’t help us make better decisions?

It’s all about striking a balance between speed and structure to find the sweet spot where you can maximize results.

Where is your happy medium between speed and structure and what do you need to do to get there?

Looking for more insights?
Check out my podcast series called Hockey Management, where I use hockey as an analogy for successful business results.
Prefer watching videos? The take a look at my short videos providing operational excellence tips.
Follow me on Twitter @AndrewMillerACM

To request an interview or more information, please contact:

 
Andrew Miller
416-480-1336
© Andrew Miller. All rights reserved. 2015.

Miller’s Monday Morning Message

Andrew MillerMiller’s Monday Morning Message
presented by ACM Consulting Inc.

Andrew Miller on operational excellence, strategy, life balance and everything in between

Toronto – November 10, 2014
We use the word “culture” to describe how an organization as a whole behaves. Entrepreneurial culture. Collaborative culture. Customer-focused culture. This doesn’t make much sense because we can’t change a culture. Culture is something that happens as a result of certain behaviours. When organizations say that they want to change their “culture,” what they really mean is that they want to change the behaviours in their organization.
 
Changing the behaviours of the employees in an organization is not that difficult in theory. Here’s a short how-to checklist:

  1. Determine the behaviour you want employees to exhibit.
  2. Tell employees the behaviour you expect them to exhibit.
  3. Ensure managers and leaders exhibit that behaviour.
  4. Evaluate and measure people based on whether or not they exhibit that behaviour.
Too many organizations don’t even make it past the first step because they really aren’t sure what kind of environment they want to have. They don’t know how they want their people to behave, or more likely, are unwilling to behave that way themselves.
 
When you try to change behaviours within your organization, what poses the biggest barrier to making those changes?
To request an interview or more information, please contact:
 
Andrew Miller
416-480-1336

Follow me on Twitter @AndrewMillerACM
© Andrew Miller. All rights reserved. 2014.

Creating a culture focused on customer retention

Here are five steps to help you create an organizational culture focused on customer retention:

  1. Gather customer stories.
  2. Share those stories internally.
  3. Create internal ambassadors.
  4. Share the stories externally.
  5. Create external ambassadors.

Employ these five steps and you will see customer retention rise and your bottom line increase.

How do I know if I have an innovative corporate culture?

As a follow-up to my recent post, where I mentioned that organizations that formally manage innovation are more successful, I wanted to probe further into the question “How do we know if our innovation process is successful?”

For one thing, instead of focusing on the number of new products and services you bring to market, measure the percentage of revenue those new products and services represent. An innovation can only be successful if it has commercial viability, otherwise why innovate? An organization can only say that it has a culture of innovation if a large percentage of its’ revenues come from products and services that didn’t exist three or four years ago.

If you want to know whether or not your organization is successful at creating innovation, look at the breakdown of your revenue. How much of that revenue is represented by products and services that did not exist five years ago? If the answer is less than 30% then you are not an innovative company. You may be a successful company (and there’s nothing wrong with that), but you’re not an innovative company.

How will you ensure a culture of innovation in your organization?