Miller’s Monday Morning Message

Andrew MillerMiller’s Monday Morning Message
presented by ACM Consulting Inc.

Andrew Miller on operational excellence, strategy, life balance and everything in between

Toronto – March 17, 2014
March Madness, the annual college basketball tournament in the United States, begins this week. For the next three weeks, the best college basketball teams will play for the national championship. What is equally exciting is watching the fans from the different colleges cheer on their teams. These fans are proud and passionate about the colleges they attend and are not afraid to show it.
 
Are you creating fans for your organization?
 
Your employees should be just as proud and passionate about your organization as they are for their alma mater. There are a few things you can do to ensure you are creating an organization full of fans, and here are three of them:
  • Hire people who are passionate about your organization and what you offer. I have developed the ACM model which are principles to be used when hiring.
  • Perform random acts of recognition. Make sure your employees know that they are respected and appreciated.
  • Offer them new and challenging work. There are always big upsets in March Madness when a team has a huge challenge to beat a better team and they take advantage of that opportunity. You’ll never know how good employees can be unless they are given the opportunity to do great things.
So while you are sitting back and enjoying March Madness over the next three weeks, think about how you can help your employees become fanatics for your organization.

To request an interview or more information, please contact:
 
Andrew Miller
416-480-1336
 
Follow me on Twitter @AndrewMillerACM
© Andrew Miller. All rights reserved. 2014.

Operational Excellence Global View – How the Big Name Companies Achieve It

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Andrew discusses how successful companies use innovation, speed and managing/attracting talent, to achieve operational excellence.

Yahoo and Working from Home

Working from home can be a blessing for both employers and employees, but only if the process is managed properly. Andrew explains how Yahoo went wrong and how you can avoid making the same type of mistake.

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Can employee turnover be too low?

To continue to build off of my post from a few weeks ago, today I want to talk about employee turnover. Can employee turnover ever be too low?

The short answer to that question is, “Yes,” employee turnover can be too low.

There can be a lot of discussion about what the right number is, but just like an economy’s unemployment rate, the turnover rate should never be zero or close to it. “But this goes against everything we’ve ever learned,” you might say.

Here are some reasons why employee turnover can be a good thing:

  • Employees who are no longer meeting or exceeding expectations can be replaced with people who can.
  • New employees breathe new ideas into the organization, bring new energy and a different perspective.
  • New employees aren’t afraid to challenge the way the company operates if they have a better way of doing things.
  • It gives the organization the opportunity to re-create the structure and accountabilities of various job functions.
  • It shows your top people that there is no culture of entitlement. People need to continue to earn their positions.

Having loyal employees who stay with an organization is not a bad thing, as long as those employees are growing with the organization. The way an organization operates now is different than it did 15-20 years ago. Without new ideas and people who are able to adapt to the changing environment, companies will fall behind their competitors.

Miller’s Monday Morning Message

Andrew MillerMiller’s Monday Morning Message
presented by ACM Consulting Inc.Andrew Miller on operational excellence, strategy, life balance and everything in between

Toronto – March 4, 2013
This week, Yahoo announced that employees are no longer permitted to work from home. Every Yahoo employee must now move to a corporate office. Yahoo cited lost productivity and a lack of employee collaboration as the reasons for the new policy. In reality, this decision was made because Yahoo did a poor job of managing employees and their employees took advantage of that. This should be concerning for two reasons: firstly, that Yahoo employees aren‘t respectful enough of the company to not abuse the work from home policy; and secondly, that the situation got so bad that Yahoo needed to go to an extreme to stop it.
 
Most of the commentary about this move focuses on how it will hurt Yahoo’s ability to attract the best and brightest people to the organization. The bigger concern should be retaining the people that they already have. What strategy do they have in place to transition those employees who currently work from home and would like to continue to do so? How do you handle those employees who were exceeding expectations while still working from home? Yahoo has some big challenges ahead in selling this change to a workforce that is used to more flexible and relaxed policies.
 
Here’s what organizations can do to avoid these kinds of situations:
  • Ensure each employee has clear accountabilities – Don’t focus on activities to be performed, but results to be achieved. If each employee knows what they are accountable for, it becomes much easier for them to focus their efforts and to measure their performance.
  • Manage their performance regularly Employee performance should be managed regularly to ensure that they are achieving the accountabilities laid out for them. If they are not meeting expectations, then a change needs to be made. If managed properly, the change will not need to be as extreme as the move that Yahoo is making.
  • Set the expectation that time in the office is requiredSince creativity can sometimes be fostered more effectively when done collaboratively, organiztions can set the expectation that employees can work from home for a portion of the week, but need to be in the office for the remaining days. This gives the organization and the employees the best of both worlds.
“The challenge with making a decision like this is that it takes things to the extreme,” says Andrew Miller, President of ACM Consulting. “Yahoo is saying to its employees that there is no trust to get the proper work done without supervision. This is not a strong foundation for retaining their best people.This looks like a quick reaction to a problem that has been festering for a while.”
 
To request an interview or more information, please contact:
 
Andrew Miller
416-480-1336
 
Follow me on Twitter @AndrewMillerACM
© Andrew Miller. All rights reserved. 2013