Miller’s Monday Morning Message

Andrew MillerMiller’s Monday Morning Message
presented by ACM Consulting Inc.

Andrew Miller on operational excellence, strategy, life balance and everything in between

Toronto – May 5, 2014
We talk so often about the importance of experience and we feel that the longer we have been doing something, the better we are at it. But that’s not necessarily true. Just because someone has been in the same job for 25 years doesn’t mean they can do it better than someone who has never done it before. The fact that a person has 30 years experience in the same industry doesn’t make them an expert in the industry, it just means they have been there a long time.
 
We often overrate experience because it gives us comfort to hire someone with experience. You can’t go wrong hiring someone who has 25 years experience in the same industry, can you? Of course you can.
 
The Toronto Raptors lost to the Brooklyn Nets yesterday in Game 7 of their playoff series. Through the previous 10 games, the teams were very evenly matched even though Brooklyn’s players have a great deal more experience than the Raptors. But they only won by one point. If the Raptors, the more inexperienced team, had won, would anyone talk about the importance of Brooklyn’s experience?
 
Experience may be a factor in the results a person can achieve, but we shouldn’t be hiring or making decisions purely based on someone’s experience. We should be hiring someone based on their ability to achieve the results we expect. Experience is only one factor that may contribute to their ability to get those results.
 
Before looking at experience, organizations that are hiring should be looking at a candidate’s attitude, competency, and mindset. This is my ACM model. Experience only matters if it will help achieve better results. Don’t hire purely based on experience, but based on whether you think the candidate can meet or exceed what is expected of them.
 
To request an interview or more information, please contact:
 
Andrew Miller
416-480-1336
 
Follow me on Twitter @AndrewMillerACM
© Andrew Miller. All rights reserved. 2014.

Miller’s Monday Morning Message

Andrew MillerMiller’s Monday Morning Message
presented by ACM Consulting Inc.

Andrew Miller on operational excellence, strategy, life balance and everything in between

Toronto – January 27, 2014
We throw around catch phrases and use words like engagement, ambassador, and experience when we talk about customers, but what we really need to do is offer them something of value. We need to talk with customers, we need to anticipate what they need, and we need to develop a product or service that can meet that need.
 
It can actually be quite a simple process. Start with the value that you can offer, determine who would most benefit from that value, and then identify the most effective method for delivering that value. This can only happen when you know what your strengths are and understand what your customers value. You don’t need a survey or focus groups for that, just a few interesting conversations.
 
To request an interview or more information, please contact:
 
Andrew Miller
416-480-1336
 
Follow me on Twitter @AndrewMillerACM
© Andrew Miller. All rights reserved. 2013.

Key points for customer retention

Last week, I hosted a group of executives at the Four Seasons hotel in Toronto to discuss the importance of customer retention and how it impacts company profitability and growth. Executives from some of the most iconic and successful companies in Canada were in attendance.

Some of the key points we discussed were:

•    There are four key elements to realizing the exponential value of customer retention; Stratification, cultivation, experience, and metrics.

•    There is a direct link between employee empowerment and customer retention. The more you empower employees, the better customer retention will be.

•    Creating a culture focused on customer retention requires removing organizational silos and focusing on the depth of customer relationships, not just the number of customers.

•    Many organizations struggle with tying brand awareness to bottom line results.

It was a unique forum for this kind of discussion because most executives don’t have the opportunity to engage with peers outside of their industry around a specific area like customer retention. And usually not in an intimate setting that fosters good conversations. The comment from almost all the participants was the value of learning what has worked and what hasn’t from colleagues in other industries and collaborating on better ways of operating.

I have hosted many successful events such as this for both industry associations as well as for my own networks, and will be hosting more in 2014.