Do You Know When to Ignore Customer Feedback?

While giving a speech to a group of association executives yesterday, I told them that there were only three factors in determining whether or not to act on customer (member) feedback. Those factors are impact, alignment, and feasibility.

Organizations are being given constant feedback through a variety of channels and I wanted to provide a framework to help determine what feedback to act upon and what feedback to ignore.

Impact means that acting upon the feedback will provide a benefit to your organization. That benefit can be financial or increase your reputation, or help you attract and retain customers.

Alignment means that acting on the feedback will align with your overall corporate strategy. It will help you move closer to your ideal future state.

Feasibility means that it is actually possible to act upon the feedback.

Only when all three of these factors are present, does it makes sense to act upon customer feedback. See the visual below to help explain why.

Slide1

If acting upon the feedback is feasible and can have an impact, but doesn’t align with your corporate direction, then you are taking a wrong turn.

If acting upon the feedback can have an impact and aligns with your corporate direction, but isn’t feasible, then it’s a pipe dream

If acting upon the feedback is feasible and aligns with your corporate direction, but will have no impact, you are wasting resources.

When you have all three, it is a game changer.

Do you know when to act upon customer feedback and when to ignore it?

Creating a Low Centre of Gravity for Your Organization

Organizations want to maximize impact in everything they do. In order to do that, you need to create a low centre of gravity. You need to not only be able to remove obstacles, you need to be able to go through them. Hence the importance of the low centre of gravity.

In order to create that low centre of gravity, organizations need to master three elements:

  1. Speed – you need to approach any initiative or strategy with speed.
  2. Angle – You need to take the right approach and have the right angle.
  3. Power – You need to come with strength and power.

If any of these three elements are missing, you will not be able to maximize impact and go through the obstacles in your way. The visual below shows the sweet spot between the three elements and what happens if you are not in that sweet spot.

Low Centre of Gravity

If you have speed and power, but the wrong angle, you will miss your target.

If you have speed and the right angle, but no power, you will get run over.

If you have the right angle and power, but no speed, you will get left behind.

If you have speed, power, and the right angle, you will maximize impact.

Miller’s Monday Morning Message

Andrew MillerMiller’s Monday Morning Message
presented by ACM Consulting Inc.

Andrew Miller on operational excellence, strategy, life balance and everything in between

Toronto – December 29, 2014
In a recent post, I discussed how innovation was one of the keys to achieving operational excellence in the future. But innovation in the sense of effectively applying and adopting new ideas to maximize their impact.
I recently spoke to a group of high potential managers and directors and suggested some key factors in maximizing the impact and value of new ideas:
  • Creating an innovation council or some separate body accountable for effectively managing the idea and innovation process.
  • Developing common decision-making criteria for the prioritization of ideas.
  • Developing a common way for employees, suppliers, customers, and other business partners to submit ideas they have generated.
  • Fostering an innovative environment by rewarding desired behaviour and not just victories.
  • Identifying new and creative ways to share best practices across the entire organization.
  • Utilizing a formal process for managing innovation and ideas.

How many of these key success factors is your organizing exhibiting as it pertains to innovation?

I want to wish you and your families a happy and healthy holiday season!

Listen to my podcast on why Operational Excellence needs to be redefined.
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To request an interview or more information, please contact:

 
Andrew Miller
416-480-1336
© Andrew Miller. All rights reserved. 2014.

Miller’s Monday Morning Message

Andrew MillerMiller’s Monday Morning Message
presented by ACM Consulting Inc.

Andrew Miller on operational excellence, strategy, life balance and everything in between

Toronto – October 20, 2014
Growing up playing hockey, I was never the biggest or the strongest player on the ice. But once I started playing contact, I realized that I could knock almost any player over. I had a low centre of gravity and I developed a good sense of skating at the right speed, taking the right angle, and delivering the impact in the right spot.
 
Organizations that want to be successful need to develop a low centre of gravity. When you have a low centre of gravity you are able to knock over bigger obstacles. Those obstacles might be external (competitors, market access, government regulations), or they might be internal (unwillingness to change, bureaucracy, poor leadership). Organizations that develop that low centre of gravity do so by focusing on speed, angles, and impact.
 
They determine the optimal speed at which to operate. They approach from the proper angle in order to maximize the impact of what they are doing.
 
Does your organization have a low centre of gravity or are you standing upright, ready to be knocked over?
To request an interview or more information, please contact:
 
Andrew Miller
416-480-1336

Follow me on Twitter @AndrewMillerACM
© Andrew Miller. All rights reserved. 2014.