Miller’s Monday Morning Message

Andrew MillerMiller’s Monday Morning Message
presented by ACM Consulting Inc.

Andrew Miller on operational excellence, strategy, life balance and everything in between

Toronto – May 4, 2015
Now that I have had a week to recover, I can tackle the subject of the Toronto Raptors losing in the first round of the NBA playoffs in four straight games. The Raptors lost because the other team was more disciplined in their approach and had better leadership. Yet, it had nothing to do with coaching.
When adversity hits, you need leadership throughout an organization in order to deal with that adversity. It can’t just come from the top. You need to have leadership on the front lines, not just in the executive suite and the boardroom. The Raptors needed leadership on the court, not just on the bench.
Do you know who your front line leaders are? Just remember, they may not always be the people with fancy titles or large salaries.
Looking for more insights?
Each Wednesday I will be posting a short video tip to help organizations improve operational excellence. Click here to watch them.
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To request an interview or more information, please contact:

 
Andrew Miller
416-480-1336
© Andrew Miller. All rights reserved. 2015.

 

Miller’s Monday Morning Message

Andrew MillerMiller’s Monday Morning Message
presented by ACM Consulting Inc.Andrew Miller on operational excellence, strategy, life balance and everything in between

Toronto – April 14, 2014
The passing of the former Federal Finance Minister this past week led us all to reminisce about what a great person and what a great leader Jim Flaherty was. It also caused me to reflect on why so many people enjoyed working with him and how he acted as a leader. Here are some reasons why he, and many other great leaders, are able to be successful, regardless of where they are in an organization:
  • He was well-respected. Too many leaders worry about being liked instead of respected. Jim Flaherty was also well-liked, but it’s the respect he earned from others that allowed him to achieve great things, and this included respect from members of the opposition.
  • He was passionate. There was never a question about his devotion to the country and what he was trying to achieve. It’s obvious to others when a leader is not passionate about what they are trying to accomplish, and no one will follow someone who is just going through the motions.
  • He had a clear goal. He had a consistent vision to balance Canada’s budget and everything he did was to help accomplish that goal. Too many leaders don’t have a clear priority that they can focus on.

Most leaders are too focused on being liked or don’t have the ability to let go of control, so it hinders the development of the people below them and limits the results they can achieve. What will be your leadership legacy?

To request an interview or more information, please contact:
 
Andrew Miller
416-480-1336
 
Follow me on Twitter @AndrewMillerACM
© Andrew Miller. All rights reserved. 2014.

Technology and Operational Excellence

podcast-sleeve1 

Andrew discusses technology’s role in the quest for operational excellence.

Miller’s Monday Morning Message

Andrew MillerMiller’s Monday Morning Message
presented by ACM Consulting Inc.

Andrew Miller on operational excellence, strategy, life balance and everything in between

Toronto – June 17, 2013
I know this concept sounds counter-intuitive, harnessing child-like tendencies to improve business performance, but maybe it’s not so far-fetched. We spend our whole lives trying to become more “grown up.” But on my run this morning, I was thinking about some of the characteristics children have that are actually beneficial for successful leaders and executives. We need to harness the inner child that permits us to live more in the moment and take more chances without fear of consequence. Here are some examples of what I mean:
  • Children are curious about everything and want to absorb as much new information as they can. Great leaders exhibit that same characteristic as they search for any insight or idea that can help improve the performance of their organization.
  • Children are fearless and have not yet been trained to concern themselves with failure or consequence from their actions. I’m not suggesting we take unnecessary risks, but great leaders will always be open to trying new ideas and will consider them successful even if they fail, as long as something was learned from them.
  • Children are attracted to shiny things and then get bored of them quickly. Great leaders want to hear about new ideas but are quick to abandon the ones that don’t work.
  • Children have a desire to impress their friends with new tricks and new abilities. Great leaders are driven by that same desire to impress shareholders, employees and customers.
I’m not suggesting we turn the business world into a playground,” says Andrew Miller, president of ACM Consulting. “However, we should recognize what behaviour is innate and that we can harness to make us better leaders, improve the performance of our organizations, and allow us to be better contributors to society.
 
To request an interview or more information, please contact:
 
Andrew Miller
416-480-1336
 
Follow me on Twitter @AndrewMillerACM
© Andrew Miller. All rights reserved. 2013.

Miller’s Monday Morning Message

Andrew MillerMiller’s Monday Morning Message
presented by ACM Consulting Inc.

Andrew Miller on operational excellence, strategy, life balance and everything in between

Toronto – May 13, 2013
I was fortunate enough to spend a few days last week with some of the finest healthcare leaders in Canada, both on the provider and the industry side of the equation. Based on the many discussions I had with them and my own experiences, here are a few observations:
  • Providers and suppliers are trying to accomplish the same goals-Everyone involved ultimately wants to find a more cost effective healthcare system and one that improves patient care. The challenge is aligning short-term goals to ensure that happens.
  • No solution can happen without the involvement of government-This may even mean that government needs to step back and alleviate some of the legislation that hinders health care leaders. As it stands, some of the legislation is counter-productive and only makes it harder for leaders to do their jobs.
  • There is a lot to learn from different areas of the country-Although each region is different, many of the challenges are the same (aging population, mounting legislation, reduced budgets, and so on). We need to do a better job of sharing solutions and best practices from across the country.
  • There is a leadership gap-Many of the healthcare leaders have a great deal of experience and have been in the industry for years. It is not yet obvious where the next generation of healthcare leaders will come from. Organizations need to do a better job of succession planning to ensure that this gap gets minimized.
  • Perception is not reality-Many industry organizations assume that the roadblocks and constraints happen at the individual organization level. In fact, many of the largest challenges to overcome were not created by the individual organizations, and they are struggling just as much as industry to overcome them.

“It’s amazing what can happen when you bring some of the best minds together and talk about specific issues and opportunities,” says Andrew Miller, president of ACM Consulting. “You realize that it is not hard to find common areas of interest and benefit. The problem is that we don’t provide enough forums for all of the parties to come together and develop the right solutions.” 

To request an interview or more information, please contact:
 
Andrew Miller
416-480-1336
 
Follow me on Twitter @AndrewMillerACM
© Andrew Miller. All rights reserved. 2013.