Miller’s Monday Morning Message

Andrew MillerMiller’s Monday Morning Message
presented by ACM Consulting Inc.

Andrew Miller on operational excellence, strategy, life balance and everything in between

Toronto – June 9, 2014
In my Monday Morning Message from a couple of weeks ago, I wrote that in order to increase profit margins, you needed to create an emotional connection with customers which would create customer continuance (E = mc2). One of the ways to do that is through consistency, so that customers know what to expect each time they have an experience with your organization.
 
Every Sunday morning my daughter and I go grocery shopping at the local Loblaws. This has become the weekly tradition. We go first thing in the morning before the Sunday morning rush to ensure that everything on our list is available and on the shelves. Yesterday, I was unable to go shopping in the morning and was forced to go in the afternoon. This is usually the worst time to go because after the morning rush of shoppers, the shelves are bare and the aisles are filled with employees trying to restock them.
 
But to my surprise, when I went yesterday afternoon the shelves were fully stocked and the aisles were not filled with employees blocking them with giant carts. My afternoon shopping experience went as smoothly as my normal morning experience. Loblaws provided consistency of experience and that is something that I noticed.
 
McDonald’s is another example of an organization that provides a consistent experience. Regardless of where you are in the world, the McDonald’s experience is similar. They have set certain expectations for services and quality.
 
What are you doing to provide a consistent experience every time your customers interact with you?
 
To request an interview or more information, please contact:
 
Andrew Miller
416-480-1336

My new book, Redefining Operational Excellence, is now available. Click here to order your copy.

Follow me on Twitter @AndrewMillerACM
© Andrew Miller. All rights reserved. 2014.

Miller’s Monday Morning Message

Andrew MillerMiller’s Monday Morning Message
presented by ACM Consulting Inc.

Andrew Miller on operational excellence, strategy, life balance and everything in between

Toronto – June 2, 2014
In my new book, Redefining Operational Excellence, I talk about four phases of operational excellence:
  • Phase 1: Lack of Direction
  • Phase 2: Awareness
  • Phase 3: Commitment
  • Phase 4: Mastery

Most organizations never make it past phase 3, and even if they do, they don’t stay there very long. The organizations who make it to the Mastery phase and stay there (think Procter & Gamble, McDonald’s, 3M, Disney) do things differently than other organizations. They are able to find money and performance boosts in areas that others don’t normally look.

Here’s how:

  • They look for departments, divisions, and areas of the organization that have not been recently reviewed and they review them.
  • They hire not just based on past and current needs, but also on future needs that align with the direction the organization is taking.
  • They look for opportunities in what’s happening in the industry or with their competitors.
  • They don’t ask customers what they want, they show customers what they need.
  • They constantly innovate and look for ways to improve performance.

If you are interested in determining what phase of operational excellence you are in and some strategies to achieve mastery, contact me and I will send you a self-assessment that only takes a few minutes.

To request an interview or more information, please contact:

 
Andrew Miller
416-480-1336

My new book, Redefining Operational Excellence, is now available. Click here to order your copy.

Follow me on Twitter @AndrewMillerACM
© Andrew Miller. All rights reserved. 2014.

Even McDonald’s Can Fall Prey to Poor Product Expansion

McDonald’s has always been an iconic company not only for its brand, but also the way it operates. Recently, McDonald’s has expanded its menu based on the different tastes of its customers. But it may have fallen prey to its desire to expand its customer base. Service has become slower, customers are more frustrated, and sales are not going up.

McDonald’s quickly realized that they changed the menu without changing the way they operate. It shows us that even the best companies in the world can make mistakes. But, as great companies do, McDonald’s has identified the issue and is taking steps to remedy it.